Jack Smith plays his best card against Trump

Raushan

In his struggle against former President Donald Trump, prosecutor Jack Smith has enlisted the help of one of America’s most accomplished Supreme Court lawyers.

According to the legal website Law360, Michael R. Dreeben became one of only seven lawyers in history to argue more than 100 Supreme Court cases in 2016.

Smith, a special counsel involved in the federal indictments against Trump, designates Dreeben as a “counselor to the special counsel” in both Smith’s petition to the Supreme Court on December 11, requesting the court to consider Trump’s case regarding presidential immunity, and in Smith’s petition to the Washington, D.C. Court of Appeals on December 30, addressing the same matter. Please refer to the concise information provided below.

In her blog, Civil Discourse, former federal prosecutor Joyce Vance praised Smith’s Court of Appeals brief as an exemplary display of legal expertise. It is not unexpected, given Jack Smith managed to get Michael Dreeben, a highly skilled former deputy solicitor general who is renowned for his expertise in Supreme Court matters.

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Dreeben is serving as a “counselor to the special counsel” for the second time in a legal matter involving Trump.

In 2017, Dreeben assumed the role of counselor to special counsel Robert Mueller in the inquiry of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and the potential act of obstructing justice. According to a biography on the website of Harvard Law School, Dreeben was in charge of providing legal and strategic guidance to the Special Counsel and all prosecution teams in the Mueller case.

Dreeben will serve as a legal consultant for Smith and his team as the case progresses towards the Supreme Court.

Dreeben is familiar with the judicial inclinations of numerous Supreme Court justices. As per the legal website SCOTUSblog, Dreeben’s initial case presented before the Supreme Court involved a medical fraud matter, with John Roberts, who is currently the chief justice of the Supreme Court, representing the opposing party.

Dreeben’s professional background, as stated on Georgetown Law School’s website, includes positions in the Office of Solicitor General within the U.S. Department of Justice. He initially served as an assistant to the solicitor general and later advanced to the role of deputy solicitor general.

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Dreeben served as deputy solicitor general from 1994 until 2019, overseeing the criminal cases presented by the United States in the U.S. Supreme Court. According to the statement, Dreeben has presented arguments in 105 cases before the Supreme Court on behalf of the United States and has prepared legal documents for hundreds of other matters in both the Supreme Court and lower federal courts.

Trump was charged with four charges of conspiring to change the results of the 2020 election in the run-up to the January 6, 2021 riot at the United States Capitol. A jury will be chosen in February in Washington, D.C., and the trial will begin on March 4. It is one of four criminal cases that Trump is facing as the Republican presidential primary frontrunner.

He has pled not guilty to all of the accusations, claiming that they are part of a political witch hunt.

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The filing was made before of the expected oral arguments on January 9.

Tanya Chutka, the judge in Trump’s election meddling trial, denied Trump’s request for presidential immunity in December. Trump has filed an appeal with the Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. All pre-trial motions in Chutkan’s court have been delayed while the Court of Appeals rules on Trump’s presidential immunity, and Trump’s attorneys have refused to handle any trial documents supplied to them by Smith’s office, including a suggested trial date.

Smith and Dreeben attempted to circumvent the appeals process by requesting a Supreme Court determination on Trump’s presidential immunity.

The Supreme Court denied Smith’s plea to expedite the case on December 23. However, it will very definitely hear the matter after the Washington D.C. Court of Appeal has considered it.

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By Raushan
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A Software engineer by profession, cook and blogger by passion
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